Author Archives: Kate Antonova

About Those Who “Abhor Violence” in People Protesting Fascism

Here’s a tweetstorm and the more easily read and shared version on Storify for those who don’t do Twitter. Warning! Strong language in this one.

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Fighting Misinformation Online

Here’s the original Tweetstorm and for those who don’t Twitter, you can read it easily on Storify.   Here’s a handy meme to use on your social media:

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Monuments are Not History (Read a Book!)

This was posted as a tweetstorm – if you don’t Twitter, you can read it easily on Storify.

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Thoughts on Charlottesville

On Twitter and Storify. UPDATE! Now on the Washington Post! Their new “Made By History” column is fantastic, by the way, and I recommend becoming a regular reader of it. If you have a .edu email address, you can get an … Continue reading

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Op-Ed on the Huffington Post

I’m really delighted to announce that my Twitter threadzilla on conservatism from a couple weeks ago has been transformed into an op-ed on the Huffington Post. It’s now polished up, beautifully edited by HuffPo, and ready to share easily! Please … Continue reading

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Your reading for today

Every once in a while you come across one of those things that makes you see the world more clearly, and it becomes part of you from that moment on. I had that experience recently when I read this beautiful … Continue reading

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What is a Russianist?

I tweeted a long thread today on what Russianist training looks like and the various levels of Russia “specialists.” It’s storified here.

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Paperback edition of _An Ordinary Marriage_ is out!

I’m very excited to announce that my first book, An Ordinary Marriage: The World of a Gentry Family in Provincial Russia (Oxford University Press, 2013) is now available in paperback! OUP has regular seasonal sales you might look out for. It’s … Continue reading

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Previews of a Student’s Guide to Writing History

I’ve only recently submitted the full manuscript of my upcoming book on writing for students taking history courses. It won’t appear until 2018, but in the meantime I’ll be occasionally tweeting short excerpts. Find them with the hashtag #SGWH and … Continue reading

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The Past and Future of Higher Education

I indulged in a Sunday afternoon tweet storm of massive proportions today. You can read it all here.

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Humans of the Academy

I’m very pleased to announce that I’ve been involved with some friends in launching a new website called Humans of the Academy. This site offers regular profiles of ordinary humans who work throughout the academy. Its purpose is to show … Continue reading

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The Chikhachev estate could be yours

The provincial estate, Dorozhaevo, at the center of my first monograph, An Ordinary Marriage: The World of a Gentry Family in Provincial Russia, is now up for sale. Amazing photographs of it available here, too. Compare this with the images and … Continue reading

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Storified Tweets

I’ve been putting what little spare time I have lately to keeping up with incredibly fast-moving events on Twitter, and have Tweet-stormed some thoughts there on how history is being used and misused that should by rights probably have been … Continue reading

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20 Ways to Fight American Fascism

1. Stand up for truth. Call a spade a spade every time, even when it’s awkward or uncomfortable. 2. Model best practices by following evidence and reasoning regardless of the source or your own prejudices. Be transparent about how you … Continue reading

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History Happening Now: 2017 Women’s March

The scale of today’s Women’s March is probably unprecedented in the US and perhaps also as a global event. What I tell my students when we talk about historical protests is to think about what is involved in traveling, taking … Continue reading

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Now Available in Paperback!

A Consumer’s Guide to Information is now fully released everywhere it’s going to be – you can buy it in paperback from Amazon or in eBook from most eBook distributors, including Barnes & Noble and iTunes as well as Amazon. … Continue reading

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Consuming Information

I did something completely unplanned and unscheduled: I wrote an extra book. I’m still steadily working on my book on writing history as well as researching my next monograph on the policing of religious faith in early nineteenth-century Russia, but … Continue reading

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Historical Analogies: A Difficult Game

This has been a season of historical analogies in the press and on social media. The thing is, as pretty much any scholarly historian will tell you, historical analogies are an incredibly tricky thing and almost no one gets them right. … Continue reading

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Causal Reasoning: How Historians Teach People to Think

As a historian watching the unprecedented historical event of Trump’s election, I can’t help but constantly see the ways that historical thinking is misused or misunderstood, or that the usefulness of historical thinking is just totally unknown to most people. … Continue reading

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Restart

This blog went inactive for a while, so here’s an update to serve as a re-start. Regular posting to resume shortly. I went on hiatus while preparing my tenure dossier, and was very happy just now to edit the home … Continue reading

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Interview in Fair Observer!

Another interview about my book, An Ordinary Marriage, has been made available, this time in text form from the Fair Observer. Thanks so much to my interviewer, James Wiener, and the FO editors, who were wonderful to work with. In addition, I was delighted to … Continue reading

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Podcast interview about my book!

I recently had the great pleasure of talking about my book with Anna Fishzon, new host of New Books in Russia and Eurasia (part of the fantastic New Books Network of podcasts).   Here’s the interview!

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The Absent-Minded Professor

You know the stereotype: the professor with crooked glasses, bumping into doors, unable to remember his own name? I actually taught for weeks with broken glasses one semester, because I didn’t have time to replace them until the break. And … Continue reading

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Making High School Suck Less

 Today I read this article arguing that while the attention being paid lately—most notably by the President in his State of the Union—on expanding Pre-K and making college more accessible are laudable education reforms, if you look at the statistics, … Continue reading

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How to Read for Class

If you’ve tried reading a scholarly book or article the same way you would approach a terrific new novel of your favorite genre, you’ve probably discovered that the scholarly work doesn’t flow in the same way, and you may find … Continue reading

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“Should I Go to Grad School?”

Wrong reasons: -You want to stay in school. -You’re afraid of the job market. -You don’t know what else to do. -You’re really smart and do well in school, so you should prove that by going as far as you … Continue reading

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It’s That Time of the Semester

It’s mid-term exam season! These are some checks you should do before turning in any take-home essay exam for a history class. If you have any ambition to do well, you should be at the point where you think you’ve … Continue reading

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A review!

My first and likely best book review.

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“I need an A in this class”

If you have uttered this phrase to an authority figure at college, you have already hopelessly screwed up your chances. You’re doing everything wrong. I mean it: there’s no way to lighten up this message. You screwed up. I’m sorry. … Continue reading

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“My prof is so stupid”

I’ve heard this said on my campus. Often by a student who is also making fundamental factual and grammatical errors in the process of an extended whine that, I can only assume, was prompted by a lower-than-expected grade. I’ve also … Continue reading

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