Author Archives: Kate Antonova

Storified Tweets

I’ve been putting what little spare time I have lately to keeping up with incredibly fast-moving events on Twitter, and have Tweet-stormed some thoughts there on how history is being used and misused that should by rights probably have been … Continue reading

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20 Ways to Fight American Fascism

1. Stand up for truth. Call a spade a spade every time, even when it’s awkward or uncomfortable. 2. Model best practices by following evidence and reasoning regardless of the source or your own prejudices. Be transparent about how you … Continue reading

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History Happening Now: 2017 Women’s March

The scale of today’s Women’s March is probably unprecedented in the US and perhaps also as a global event. What I tell my students when we talk about historical protests is to think about what is involved in traveling, taking … Continue reading

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Now Available in Paperback!

A Consumer’s Guide to Information is now fully released everywhere it’s going to be – you can buy it in paperback from Amazon or in eBook from most eBook distributors, including Barnes & Noble and iTunes as well as Amazon. … Continue reading

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Consuming Information

I did something completely unplanned and unscheduled: I wrote an extra book. I’m still steadily working on my book on writing history as well as researching my next monograph on the policing of religious faith in early nineteenth-century Russia, but … Continue reading

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Historical Analogies: A Difficult Game

This has been a season of historical analogies in the press and on social media. The thing is, as pretty much any scholarly historian will tell you, historical analogies are an incredibly tricky thing and almost no one gets them right. … Continue reading

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Causal Reasoning: How Historians Teach People to Think

As a historian watching the unprecedented historical event of Trump’s election, I can’t help but constantly see the ways that historical thinking is misused or misunderstood, or that the usefulness of historical thinking is just totally unknown to most people. … Continue reading

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Restart

This blog went inactive for a while, so here’s an update to serve as a re-start. Regular posting to resume shortly. I went on hiatus while preparing my tenure dossier, and was very happy just now to edit the home … Continue reading

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Interview in Fair Observer!

Another interview about my book, An Ordinary Marriage, has been made available, this time in text form from the Fair Observer. Thanks so much to my interviewer, James Wiener, and the FO editors, who were wonderful to work with. In addition, I was delighted to … Continue reading

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Podcast interview about my book!

I recently had the great pleasure of talking about my book with Anna Fishzon, new host of New Books in Russia and Eurasia (part of the fantastic New Books Network of podcasts).   Here’s the interview!

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The Absent-Minded Professor

You know the stereotype: the professor with crooked glasses, bumping into doors, unable to remember his own name? I actually taught for weeks with broken glasses one semester, because I didn’t have time to replace them until the break. And … Continue reading

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Making High School Suck Less

 Today I read this article arguing that while the attention being paid lately—most notably by the President in his State of the Union—on expanding Pre-K and making college more accessible are laudable education reforms, if you look at the statistics, … Continue reading

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How to Read for Class

If you’ve tried reading a scholarly book or article the same way you would approach a terrific new novel of your favorite genre, you’ve probably discovered that the scholarly work doesn’t flow in the same way, and you may find … Continue reading

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“Should I Go to Grad School?”

Wrong reasons: -You want to stay in school. -You’re afraid of the job market. -You don’t know what else to do. -You’re really smart and do well in school, so you should prove that by going as far as you … Continue reading

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It’s That Time of the Semester

It’s mid-term exam season! These are some checks you should do before turning in any take-home essay exam for a history class. If you have any ambition to do well, you should be at the point where you think you’ve … Continue reading

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A review!

My first and likely best book review.

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“I need an A in this class”

If you have uttered this phrase to an authority figure at college, you have already hopelessly screwed up your chances. You’re doing everything wrong. I mean it: there’s no way to lighten up this message. You screwed up. I’m sorry. … Continue reading

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“My prof is so stupid”

I’ve heard this said on my campus. Often by a student who is also making fundamental factual and grammatical errors in the process of an extended whine that, I can only assume, was prompted by a lower-than-expected grade. I’ve also … Continue reading

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“Grades are so subjective”

Actually, they’re probably less subjective than you think. And to the degree that there is still some subjectivity, it probably works in your favor, not against you. First, in many classes these days grades may be almost completely objective, as … Continue reading

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ASEEES and AHA

In the last few months I’ve enjoyed the rich alphabet soup of attending ASEEES and AHA in NOLA. Say what? I mean I attended the annual conference of Slavicists and Eastern Europeanists and that of the American Historical Association, which … Continue reading

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I’m on the OUP blog!

Check out my guest post today on the Oxford University Press blog, about a mid-nineteenth-century Russian stay-at-home-dad.

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Book!

My first book is now available as an ebook, and will ship soon in hardcover from Amazon! It has already made its appearance at the annual conference of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies in November. And … Continue reading

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Adventures in Russian archives

I first arrived in Ivanovo, Russia, in the fall of 2004 by overnight train from Moscow. We pulled into Ivanovo at seven in the morning, and I peeked out, still sleepy and disoriented. I asked the elderly gentlemen getting off … Continue reading

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Dickens and Dostoevsky Just Got Real

Check out this nicely written and detailed summary of a recent dissertation that should be getting a lot of attention, in my totally-not-humble opinion (the author may just happen to also be my spouse). Which reminds me to mention that … Continue reading

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What Is Socialism?

Judging by the way the media and the GOP talk about it, you might conclude that socialism is anything the GOP disagrees with. Teaching what socialism actually is is part of my job, so I get asked this quite a … Continue reading

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Russians Love Their Children Too

I’m quoting Sting, of course, in his famous — and at the time daring — song, released in 1985, during the Cold War. He was hoping that Russians, though our enemies, are human too, loving their children enough not to … Continue reading

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Unlearning High School in Five Painful Steps

This is addressed to all the college freshman out there. There are a few habits you may have learned in high school that will have to be adjusted in college. Remember that the chief difference between high school and college … Continue reading

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Revision

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who revise, and those who don’t. The former are writers, the latter are not. This implies that the way to become a writer, is to revise. A lot. And that’s … Continue reading

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Obama the Professor

There have been a lot of profiles written about Barack Obama, and I have read many of them with interest. As usual, I tend to read them with half my mind thinking about the difference between these kinds of profiles … Continue reading

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Rules

Sometimes my students get a little too hung-up on rules, when it comes to writing essays. Mind you, some rules are vital—if your writing is ungrammatical, readers will have trouble following what you are saying. Other rules (which are really … Continue reading

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